Category Archives: Uncategorized

The Dish on Cujo

I love dogs.  No – let me rephrase: I LOVE DOGS!!  To me, they are the best companions.  They are loyal, they have wicked senses of humor, they are great listeners…and they offer a protection that is very comforting.

However, few things in life are worse than a dog gone bad.  In To Kill a Mockingbird, there is a very poignant scene in which Atticus kills a rabid dog that has come into town. Every time I read or see that scene I want to cry because I bet that dog was a good dog at one time. Maybe even had a human companion that loved it very much.

Cujo on the other hand…well, this dog is just downright terrifying in the way that only the great master, Stephen King, can create.  It is not my favorite story or even movie of King’s, but with it coming to the Renaissance on July 19th, I wanted to see if there were any facts about it that might draw me in.  I certainly did find some!  Keep reading to learn some very interesting things about everyone’s most frightening beast.

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How to Win an Audition

With auditions for Annie coming up in September, and then Mamma Mia in January, now is the time to make a serious beginning to preparations in order to win the audition!  If you are a follower of this blog, three weeks ago in a blog titled “Mistakes and the Art of Perfection” I mentioned a mantra that has always helped me get to the best of my abilities: “It is a question of time, patience and intelligent work”.  For auditions, all three do apply, but I truly believe, based on personal experience, that intelligent work will help you win that audition.

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A Murder in Mansfield

This week at the Renaissance, we will be holding a special hometown screening of the documentary film A Murder in Mansfield, which focuses on the 1990 locally infamous murder of Noreen Boyle by her husband, Dr. John Boyle.  We have sold over 1500 tickets to this event so far, which shows the tremendous impression this tragedy left on our community.

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What I Know About Cars

In honor of our Rock ‘n’ Roll Car Festival that is coming up on June 23rd, I thought I would share my vast knowledge about cars.  Now before you get too excited, let me be the first to say that I have never changed a tire, nor even my own oil, but, hey!, I have been driving for a long time and with a really clean record.  Not convinced?  Well, keep reading and then you can be the judge.

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Three Things Your Child Learns In Music Class

By Audra DeLaney

We all remember walking in a line from our elementary school classroom to the music room. When I was growing up, going to music class was one of my favorite parts of the school day. I loved learning music, from scales to songs, and I also loved learning about musical instruments and their origins. Music class was a bright spot in my primary education and it teaches children more than I realized at the time.

Multicultural Appreciation

In general music curriculum, students are immersed in learning music of other cultures and time periods. As a result, children begin to understand the purpose behind music and musical instruments in a way that curates an appreciation for the art form. Music is a critical part of diversity education because it is the expression of a culture. It is tied to stories, pastimes, and customs of people who have great pride in their cultural history. Music is able to tell years of stories in minutes that would take a story teller hours to convey accurately.

Pattern Recognition

The foundation of music is patterns. Playing music utilizes both hemispheres of the brain, which helps it recognize and replicate patterns. As children move through music education, they begin to realize how repetitive some pieces of music are and how others are so dynamic that the repetition is hard to locate. Pattern recognition supports a child’s growth in the areas of math and language, thus adding to their knowledge and understanding for their future endeavors. Music class helps children build skills in pattern recognition so they may make strides in careers having to do with technology like computer science, not to mention careers in music itself.

Collaboration

From playing classroom instruments, like glockenspiels and recorders, to performing in collegiate symphonies, music is made most frequently in a group. Working together with other people is vital to the development of healthy, productive adults. When an ensemble performs a piece of music, a performer learns that their role is important, no matter how small it is, and that each role brings something to the whole performance that is necessary. Playing or singing music together helps to develop patience with others and accountability for themselves, which are skills they will need all their lives. As a musician, you develop pride in your accomplishments and acknowledge the need for others outside of yourself.

Music demands collaboration, listening and patience. Singing songs, playing instruments, participating in musical games and learning about the origins of different types of music has the ability to change a child’s life. The child may develop a soft spot for music and arts education, as I have, or the may develop an intense passion for playing and composing music in the hopes of influencing others like those before them influenced them. Music class enhances education at all ages and is needed, like art, physical education and computer skills,  to keep learning creative and engaging.

 

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From Cirque to Soleil to Hunchback – Meet Brad Cronenwett

by Colleen Cook

In last week’s blog, we highlighted a handful of our region’s talented individuals involved with our production of The Hunchback of Notre Dame (which runs March 3-4, 11-12). If there’s one thing we’re passionate about, it’s providing top-notch arts and entertainment put together by the countless talented musicians, artists, performers, technicians, and creatives in our region.

This week, we’re going to dig in with someone you may not already know, whose work will take Hunchback to a different level. Bradley Cronenwett was born and raised in Shelby, and has gone on to do big things in the industry – most recently working with Cirque du Soleil!

Colleen Cook: What is your background? How did you get from Shelby to Cirque du Soleil?

Bradley Cronenwett: I was born and raised in Shelby, and have been an Ohioan for most of my life. While growing up I was an active part of The Ren community helping design productions with the resident designer at the time, Don Pontious. I really credit him for all of my lighting knowledge because he was such an integral part of my passion for lighting.

Through the years doing multiple types of production, working at The Walt Disney resort, and continuing to grow my knowledge in the field I began to apply for Cirque. I made lots of connections along the way, and we all know how small this world is, especially in production. As the news began traveling, one thing led to another and I began interviewing for positions.

I certainly did not get the first job I applied for. It was probably a span of six months of waiting and interviewing before I finally got the golden ticket. I joined Cirque du Soleil’s Amaluna in Amsterdam, April of 2016.

CC: How did you get involved with Hunchback?

BC: While attending a preview of A Christmas Carol the cast, myself and Michael Thomas all when out to dinner after the rehearsal and we discussed my current adventures with Cirque. I had mentioned that I was back in Ohio to help with the Richland Academy’s production of The Nutcracker which I think sparked a conversation. Later on Michael and I spoke about the show and I continued to express my interest in helping out. So here I am!

CC: What is your vision for the lighting design in Hunchback? What has inspired you, and what can the audience expect?

BC: My vision for designing the Hunchback lighting was to keep certain design elements in the show as true to the actual cathedral as best as we could. Earlier this month I  was on holiday in Paris, and visited the cathedral. I studied the shadows, the colors, how the light interacted with the cold stone pillars, and of course admired the colors of the beautiful stained glass windows.

We want to take the entire theater to Paris for a brief moment and let them experience how the cathedral must have looked in 1482. Of course the cathedral is just one setting in the show. The lights will adapt to the scene, and enhance the beautiful set, complement the costumes, and all without much notice to the audience, and that’s all by design.

Bradley continues his journey with Cirque du Soleil joining the newest Big Top show, VOLTA, touring here in the United States. You can see his work on our stage at The Hunchback of Notre Dame, March 3-4, 11-12, 2018. Get Tickets Here!

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Arts Resolutions for 2018

By Audra DeLaney

The month of January is wrapping up. For most of us, breaking one of our new year’s resolutions didn’t take too much time. While we hope you stick to your resolutions, no matter how many setbacks you have, we wanted to give you a look into how you can add the arts in Mansfield to your 2018 resolutions, even if it is almost February.

1. Attend an event at the Renaissance Theatre. 

We hit the ground running in 2018. First, we celebrated our 90th Anniversary with multiple events during the week of January 15. In the coming weeks, Renaissance Youth Opera Theatre (RYOT) will perform The Slipper and The Rose on February 3 at 7 PM and February 4 at 3 PM. The Mansfield Symphony Orchestra presents The Planets on February 10 at 8 PM. Finally, Michael Thomas and cast presents The Hunchback of Notre Dame on March 3 and 10 at 8 PM and March 4 and 11 at 230 PM. A schedule for the remaining events of the season can be found on the Event Schedule on our website.

2. Sign your child up for a class at Richland Academy of the Arts 

According to its website, the Richland Academy of the Arts exists to provide quality programming in both arts, education, and development. Richland Academy offers programs in dance, music, visual arts, and theatre. Classes for varying skill levels and ages are offered. Visit the Richland Academy Calendar for more information.

3. Check out the offerings at the Mansfield Playhouse.

The Mansfield Playhouse mission statement states it is building on its legacy of being the second oldest continuously-producing playhouse in Ohio by enriching and educating audiences and volunteers, and reaching beyond the walls of the Playhouse to embrace all elements of the community. Auditions for Say You Tomatoes will be February 27 and 28 with performances on April 27 and 28 as well as May 4, 5, and 6. The Mansfield Playhouse will also be showcasing performances of Disney’s Mulan Jr. Auditions will be held April 10 and 11 with performances on June 8, 9, 15, 16, and 17. For more information such as audition materials, showtimes, and ticket prices visit the shows tab on The Mansfield Playhouse website.

4. Head over to Richland Source After Hours concerts.

Richland Source has made a buzz in the Mansfield community since its founding in 2013. Richland Source may be known for its news reporting, but it is also known for its concert series called Richland Source After Hours. Richland Source After Hours is a monthly concert series held in Idea Works. Local musicians perform original works and covers in front of community members. For more information on show dates and times for this year, visit the Richland Source Facebook page.

5. Stop in to Element of Art’s First Friday event each month. 

Located in the Carrousel District, Element of Art is a nonprofit art gallery that showcases the talents and offerings of professional artists living with developmental disabilities. The space offers gallery for exhibition and sale of artwork as well as working studio space. Element of Art offers a variety of classes and hosts an event on the first Friday of every month for the public. At each event, live music is performed and the public is invited to listen as well as browse the selection of arts pieces for sale. It is an uplifting environment that showcases the diverse talent of Mansfield artists and musicians. For more information on upcoming classes or February’s first Friday event, visit Element of Art Studio / Gallery on Facebook.

Each year, we challenge ourselves on January 1 to break bad habits, build strong relationships and experience life in new ways. Art brings all of these goals together in Mansfield. As well, art teaches us that although we may not be perfect, we are able to learn, grow, give and love in ways we may not think possible. This is not a definite list of all the places in Mansfield that are filled to the brim with creativity, inspiration, and passion. All of the places here who use the arts as a way to connect with the community have one message to share: take care of yourself, even when you take a step backwards, and know that in this community, artists will make you laugh, cry, sing, dance, and enjoy the year you have been given.

Merry Christmas, from the Renaissance!

The Staff of the Renaissance

When it comes to Christmas, it may be our favorite time of the year as a staff. We love seeing the theatre decked out, the holiday lineup of shows, and the goodies that show up in our staff workroom all month long are simply the best (we don’t have a bad cook on our staff)!

It’s also a great time of the year to reflect on the past year and feel extra grateful for the people who have made it another great year for the arts and culture in Mansfield. If you’re reading this, you’re probably one of them.

So, Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, and may you be reminded of the many good things in your life this holiday season.

Warmest wishes,

The Renaissance Staff

Photo by Aaron Burden on Unsplash

Careers in the Arts: Entertainment Writing

by Michael Thomas

When I was young, I never envisioned a career as a writer – let alone a writer in the entertainment industry. Admittedly, I had a rough start, primarily because, early on, when participating in a creative writing class in high school, I was told I was incapable of following direction. Successful writing, it seemed, was accomplished by following a strict, preordained outline – and any wandering from the path would result in failure. Here were the basic ground rules:

  • Don’t try to funny. Funny is frivolous.
  • Satire is snarky. No one likes a smart aleck.
  • Say what you have to say as uninterestingly as possible, cite some examples of something or other, throw in a quote, use similes and a metaphor or two and then move on.

One day we were asked to write an autobiography. I filled my pages with a random array of fantastical Candide-like adventures, and proudly handed it in – expecting my teacher to pass it right along to her “Hollywood uncle” who, she said, had connections because he’d been in several Laurel and Hardy shorts. While it should have been given a low grade due to its pedestrian attempt at humor, (more Mad Magazine than Voltaire), it was instead judged on its lack of footnotes and quotes from my grandmother. “This was NOT the assignment!” was smeared across the top of my story – right next to the C-. On page three, my teacher had clearly had enough and had angrily written “You were NEVER a narcoleptic used car salesman in Sarasota. This is NONSENSE!” So much for my writing career.

At the time, I had no idea that film and television shows required writers. Like most people, I assumed that actors just made it up as they went along. So it never occurred to me that I could forge a career out of script writing. I happened into writing by accident – or at least by necessity. As a kid I’d written funny sketches – mostly ideas stolen from Mel Brooks or the Carol Burnett Show. At 11 or 12, I thought they were pretty clever – but they didn’t require much thought or planning – and they never seemed to impress my target audience – which was anyone I could get to read them.

But then I went off to acting school, where you were always being called on to perform monologues. It seemed as though there were only six or seven monologues floating around at that time – and classmates were incredibly possessive of them. “You can’t do that monologue – that’s Bill’s! Bill does that one.” So, since I couldn’t hope to compete with Bill, I started writing my own monologues – which I’m pretty sure were terrible. When performing them, I’d say they were from a little-known Off Broadway play – and I’d assign them fancy Off Broadway play titles such as Hero’s Welcome, The Blossoms are Gone or The Milwaukee Trilogy. I’d invent playwrights with fancy Off Broadway names like Everett Sinclair, Tansy Langford or Pepper Covington. It was all pretty ridiculous, but in fairly short order, I discovered that I actually began to enjoy writing more that I enjoyed performing. Perhaps it was because, when writing, you can get up and make cinnamon toast or stop and watch kitchen gadget infomercials. You can’t do that as an actor.

After college, when I was trying to find work as an actor in Chicago, I came to the realization that it was easier for me to write and create my own material to perform – especially since no one seemed particularly interested in casting me in any of their shows. What began as a whim, quickly became a passion. I spent more and more time fussing over a script and less and less time worrying about auditions, callbacks or monologues.

When one of my early stage projects became cult hit in Chicago, I shifted gears once and for all and focused exclusively on writing. It was then that I discovered what opportunities existed for writers in the entertainment industry. Everyone, it seemed, needed a writer. And no one cared if you used quotes, similes or footnotes. The qualities that failed me so miserably in my high school creative writing class were the same qualities that made me unique and original.

Now I’m not saying you should ignore your teachers. They must know something because they have books and desks and lesson plans and most of them seem very organized. But I truly believe there’s a greater power in following your own instincts – and that sometimes you don’t know what you’re looking for until you’ve found it. I’ve been lucky enough to have spent my entire career working in the arts – though I still having trouble following directions and completing a project as assigned. And who knows, if I keep it up, maybe I’ll one day be as successful as a Tansy Langford or a Pepper Covington.